Publications By Category

Publications By Type
Articles

Books

In-House Bulletins

Monographs

Policy Papers


Publications Related to Space Policy

back to publications page


Defense Technology Monitor - No. 14
Bulletins - March 14, 2017
 

The Pentagon's new project: Longer-lasting drones;
3D printing with super materials;
The evolution of drone warfare;
The ethics of future war;
From parlor games to cyberspace

 
Defense Technology Monitor - No. 11
Bulletins - December 19, 2016
 

Trending toward terminators;
Army adopts 3D printing;
Combating suicide drones;
The future of UAV fueling;
How drones are reshaping American strategy

 
Defense Technology Monitor - No. 7
Bulletins - July 27, 2016
 

Cyber command to enhance training Ops;
How to cripple the U.S. electrical grid;
Israel develops land battle drone;
NATO and the importance of cyber;
Is A.I. the future of aerial combat? 

 
Defense Technology Monitor - No. 6
Bulletins - July 6, 2016
 

China's answer to U.S. lasers;
European missile defense moves ahead;
Space assets and the fight against ISIS;
Another step forward for Iron Dome;
Railguns becoming a reality;
China takes aim with new missile 

 
Al-Qaeda Resurrects Under ISIL Shadow
Articles - May 13, 2016
 

Whatever happened to al-Qaeda? A decade-and-a-half ago, it perpetrated the single largest act of international terrorism to ever take place on American soil. Yet, these days, Osama bin Laden's terror network barely warrants a mention in the mainstream news media. Instead, it is al-Qaeda's onetime Iraqi franchise, now known as the Islamic State, or ISIL, which commands near total attention in both politics and the press. That has never been more true than on Iraq's bloodiest day of 2016 when bombs swept through Baghdad killing at least 93. 

 
Cyber Threats in the Space Domain
Policy Papers - March 31, 2016
 

The ability to access and exploit space has long been woven into the fabric of American national power. It is a critical component of global political leadership, the economy, and military power. Unfortunately, those pillars are increasingly at risk. The spread of space technology to new international actors and the increasing sophistication of those capabilities have made it possible to threaten American space systems directly. The national security community is accustomed to analyzing these threats and vulnerabilities and is pursuing a reasonable mix of policies and programs to address them. (Whether those actions are sufficient is subject to debate). However, over the last decade space and cyberspace have grown increasingly integrated. This opens up new vulnerabilities in American space systems, and gives a greater number of actors the potential to exploit those vulnerabilities...

 
Defense Technology Monitor - No. 1
Bulletins - February 19, 2016
 

Legal questions about laser weapons;
Russia's A2AD strategy;
New drone capabilities needed;
Hardening future fighters;
Hackers turned out the lights in Ukraine

 
Eurasia Security Watch - No. 336
Bulletins - April 15, 2015
 

Erdogan visits Iran;
Amid Yemen crisis, Egypt vows to protect Arab gulf;
Iraqi Kurds to cooperate with Baghdad on combating ISIS;
New domestic security law for Turkey 

 
Missile Defense Briefing Report - No. 333
Bulletins - February 19, 2015
 

Japan augments missile radars;
An Iranian Iron Dome?;
The S-300, back on the table...;
...as Moscow eyes the Arctic;
Fear and loathing in Beijing;
Missile defense of the future 

 
Space in the National Interest: Security in a Global Domain
Policy Papers - April 16, 2014
 

Space as a domain and the systems that use it are integrated with American power, whether the soft power of culture, reputation, diplomacy and economics or the hard power of armed force. For that reason, it is no longer possible to stovepipe strategic thinking about space and national security. Developments in one area directly affect others. From civil space programs that help shape foreign spending on space and trade arrangements that impact access to space and have diplomatic consequence to military systems that civilian users have come to rely upon, policymakers must approach developments in space as an integrated whole, a single phenomenon that requires expertise across the range of space activities.