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Russia Reform Monitor - No. 2248
Bulletins - September 4, 2018
 

Toward a more political Russian military;
Isolating Russians anew

 
Russia Is Giving the World a Preview of Some of Its Most Advanced Military Equipment
Articles - August 24, 2018
 

This week, Russia is hosting its biggest military exhibition—Army-2018. The exhibition is held at the recently established “Patriot” expo center not far from Moscow.  Dozens of nations, thousands of military technology samples and hundreds of thousands of visitors are expected to converge at the Patriot for the next several days. The event will feature actual weapon showcases, as well as numerous discussions and forums on current and future military technology innovation and fighting tactics.

 
Defense Technology Monitor - No. 30
Bulletins - July 16, 2018
 

Dispelling the "Fog of Data";
Unleashing the Gremlins;
Navigating the virtual battlefield;
How to traffic hypersonic weapons

 
Russian Ground Battlefield Robots: A Candid Evaluation and Ways Forward
Articles - June 25, 2018
 

Russia, like many other nations, is investing in the development of various unmanned military systems. The Russian defense establishment sees such systems as mission multipliers, highlighting two major advantages: saving soldiers’ lives and making military missions more effective. In this context, Russian developments are similar to those taking place around the world. Various militaries are fielding unmanned systems for surveillance, intelligence, logistics, or attack missions to make their forces or campaigns more effective. In fact, the Russian military has been successfully using Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) in training and combat since 2013. It has used them with great effect in Syria, where these UAVs flew more mission hours than manned aircraft in various Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) roles.

 
Defense Technology Monitor - No. 28
Bulletins - May 14, 2018
 

Slowing soldiers' biological clocks;
How 3D printers are increasing efficiency in weapons production;
Needed: Private sector help on AI;
China constructs hypersonic testing facility;
Loud, non-lethal lasers

 
Russia Reform Monitor - No. 2203
Bulletins - April 5, 2018
 

Greater NATO resolve needed;
Another poisoning in London

 
In AI, Russia Is Hustling To Catch Up
Articles - April 4, 2018
 

When Vladimir Putin said last fall that artificial intelligence is "humanity's future" and that the country that masters it will "get to rule the world," some observers guessed that the Russian president was hinting at unrevealed progress and breakthroughs in the field. But a glance at publicly available statistics indicates otherwise. Russia's annual domestic investment in AI is probably around 700 million rubles ($12.5 million) - a paltry sum next to the billions being spent by American and Chinese companies. Even if private-sector investment rises as expected to 28 billion rubles ($500 million) by 2020, that will still be just a fraction of the global total.

 
Russia Reform Monitor - No. 2201
Bulletins - April 2, 2018
 

In Syria, Russia is both "arsonist and firefighter";
A new arms race with Russia?

 
Russia Reform Monitor - No. 2200
Bulletins - March 30, 2018
 

Hacking Pyongchang;
How Russia is helping America's arms industry

 
What Iran Can Teach Us About North Korea Summit
Articles - March 12, 2018
 

You could call it the Iranian negotiating model.

After months of escalating tensions with the United States, North Korean dictator Kim Jong Un has offered to meet directly with President Trump, engendering cautious optimism from many who see this as a necessary first step to de-escalation in Asia. The White House has tentatively agreed to the meeting. And yet, without deft handling, this dialogue could allow one of the world's worst rogue states to reap enormous dividends as a result of its irresponsible conduct - much as happened with Iran in the not-so-distant past.