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Iran Democracy Monitor - No. 159
Bulletins - October 27, 2015
 

Iran's mixed economic bag;
New horizons for the Russian-Iranian alliance;
Legal troubles for the JCPOA;
Iran's costly campaign in Syria

 
Needed: A Strategy For Containing Iran
Articles - October 27, 2015
 

Last Sunday, Iran and the P5+1 countries (the U.S., U.K., France, China, Russia, and Germany) formally adopted the new nuclear agreement concluded this summer. In coming days, under the terms of the deal, formally known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), the Islamic Republic is obliged to begin implementing a series of curbs on its nuclear program. 

 
A Nuclear Deal with Iran: Managing the Consequences
Policy Papers - October 7, 2015
 

The announcement of a nuclear deal in July 2015 brought to a close nearly two years of intensive negotiations between Iran and the P5+1 powers (the U.S., UK, France, Russia, China and Germany). It also ushered in a new — and arguably more challenging — phase of American policy in the Middle East...


 
Israel Braces For Obama's Bad Iran Deal
Articles - September 15, 2015
 

JERUSALEM - It's all over but the shouting. Over the past week, the political tug-of-war over President Obama's controversial nuclear deal with Iran has tilted decisively in favor of the White House. 

Despite widespread disapproval among the American electorate, and last-ditch attempts by some in Congress to delay its passage, it increasingly appears that the agreement, formally known as the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, or JCPOA, will soon be a done deal. 

 
Global Islamism Monitor - No. 10
Bulletins - September 4, 2015
 

Life in an ISIS economy;
A free-for-all in Egypt;
Cairo's new counterterrorism ally;
Meet the Taliban's new leader;
Boko Haram expands its ambit

 
Pull The Plug On The Iran Deal
Articles - September 3, 2015
 

When the proposed Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action between Iran and the P5+1 powers was announced in July, it was sold as a tough deal with robust verification that blocked Iran's pathways to nuclear weapons and would lead to peace and stability in the region. However, it soon became apparent that the deal is much weaker than its proponents first suggested. With a vote on Capitol Hill approaching, members of Congress who rushed early to support the proposed deal need to take another look at their positions. The deal as announced weeks ago is already falling apart. 

 
Why Obama Will Open A US Embassy In Iran
Articles - August 18, 2015
 

What's next after the Obama administration's opening to Cuba? Why, an embassy in Tehran, of course. 

On Aug. 14, in a ceremony replete with pomp and circumstance, Secretary of State John Kerry presided over the formal re-opening of the US Embassy in Havana, Cuba. The occasion marked the culmination of nearly two years of quiet diplomacy between the White House and the Castro regime. 

 
Nothing In Moderation
Articles - August 18, 2015
 

 In July, President Barack Obama said that he hoped the proposed nuclear deal with Iran could lead to continued conversations with the Islamic regime "that incentivize them to behave differently in the region, to be less aggressive, less hostile, more cooperative," and to generally behave in the way nations in the international community are expected to behave. The most optimistic proponents of the deal believe that the process could open the door to more comprehensive detente, empower Iranian moderates and lead to a gradual, peaceful form of regime change - a change of heart, if not of leadership. 

 
Global Islamism Monitor - No. 9
Bulletins - August 13, 2015
 

Target: Britain;
A new leader for Boko Haram;
Taking stock of the anti-ISIS effort;
How web 2.0 aids the counterterrorism fight

 
North Korea: Iran's Pathway To A Nuclear Weapon
Articles - August 13, 2015
 

A central plank of the Obama administration's case for the nuclear deal just concluded by the P5+1 powers is that the agreement closes off "all pathways" by which the Iranian regime could acquire a nuclear capability, at least for the coming decade.