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Russia Reform Monitor - No. 2224
Bulletins - June 15, 2018
 

Russia's parliament mulls "counter-sanctions";
The benefits of military service in Syria

 
Russia Reform Monitor - No. 2223
Bulletins - June 14, 2018
 

Russia's expendable animals;
Moscow-Yerevan ties get a new lease on life

 
Russia Reform Monitor - No. 2222
Bulletins - June 13, 2018
 

Reshuffling for competitiveness;
Moscow denounces Trump's Iran deal decision

 
China Reform Monitor - No. 1329
Bulletins - May 29, 2018
 

China strengthens its hold on Philippine territory;
Beijing, Tokyo work to normalize ties

 
Global Islamism Monitor - No. 51
Bulletins - May 23, 2018
 

Pakistan's "University of Jihad";
Egypt attempts a new strategy in the Sinai;
Saudi Arabia seizes the moment against the MB...;
...and makes a move toward religious pluralism



 
Russia Reform Monitor - No. 2214
Bulletins - May 16, 2018
 

Tit-for-tat economic sanctions from Russia;
Target: Telegram

 
Russia Reform Monitor - No. 2213
Bulletins - May 15, 2018
 

New U.S. sanctions begin to bite;
Russia frustrates response to Syrian atrocities

 
Iran Democracy Monitor - No. 185
Bulletins - May 9, 2018
 

U.S. policy: Back to sanctions...;
...and plans for a broader strategy;
Meanwhile in Iran, official anger...;
...and grassroots ferment

 
Russia Reform Monitor - No. 2212
Bulletins - May 7, 2018
 

New U.S. sanctions target Russian elites;
The slow death of Russia's rural schools

 
Russia Reform Monitor - No. 2211
Bulletins - May 4, 2018
 

The Russian threat to undersea cables;
Revealed: Russia's strategy to destabilize Ukraine

 
Democrats have good reason to confirm Mike Pompeo as secretary of State
Articles - April 19, 2018
 

Mike Pompeo should be promptly confirmed as secretary of State because he is well qualified, but also because this is an extraordinarily dangerous time for the United States to be without an effective secretary of State.

American diplomacy is tasked with advancing the interests of the United States while avoiding war. Any such success depends upon American diplomats credibly issuing threats, guarantees, and offers of help. This essential credibility, in turn, depends upon the relationship of America’s secretary of State with the president. And this is perhaps the most serious reason why Pompeo is an excellent choice to be our next secretary of State.

 
The Other Iranian Threat
Articles - April 17, 2018
 

Whatever happened to the Iranian cyberthreat? Not all that long ago, American officials were preoccupied with the growing disruptive capabilities that the Islamic Republic had begun to demonstrate on the World-Wide Web. That, however, was before the start of negotiations over Iran's atomic program in 2013. Those talks allowed Iran's cyber activities to recede from public view, as policymakers in Washington focused their attention on nuclear diplomacy with Tehran, while Iranian hackers temporarily became more cautious in their choice of targets and the visibility of their attacks. More recently, worries about Iran's cyber capabilities have taken a back seat to concerns regarding Iran's growing conventional military might, and its mounting regional adventurism in places like Syria and Yemen.

 
China Reform Monitor - No. 1322
Bulletins - April 16, 2018
 

Chinese household debt grows;
Congress moves to limit Chinese influence in academia

 
Russia Reform Monitor - No. 2206
Bulletins - April 12, 2018
 

A new Kremlin counterterrorism sweep;
New details in Skripal case point to Russia

 
Russia Reform Monitor - No. 2203
Bulletins - April 5, 2018
 

Greater NATO resolve needed;
Another poisoning in London

 
Russia Reform Monitor - No. 2202
Bulletins - April 3, 2018
 

An energy war against Ukraine;
Russia's costly Syria campaign

 
Russia Reform Monitor - No. 2201
Bulletins - April 2, 2018
 

In Syria, Russia is both "arsonist and firefighter";
A new arms race with Russia?

 
Russia Reform Monitor - No. 2200
Bulletins - March 30, 2018
 

Hacking Pyongchang;
How Russia is helping America's arms industry

 
The Long Game on the Silk Road: US and EU Strategy for Central Asia and the Caucasus
Books - March 2018
 

This book argues that American and European policies toward Central Asia and the Caucasus suffer from both conceptual and structural impediments.

 
Is This The End Of EU History?
Articles - March 21, 2018
 

Remember Francis Fukayama? The American political scientist and author briefly became the darling of the political science set in the early 1990s with his theory, encapsulated in his bestselling book "The End of History and the Last Man," that the end of the Cold War marked the final evolution of mankind's search for a system of governance, and that Western-style liberal democracy had emerged as the clear winner.

 
Russia Reform Monitor - No. 2197
Bulletins - March 19, 2018
 

Navalny senses a cover-up;
Who's in charge in Syria?

 
What Moscow Thinks About When It Thinks About War Robots
Articles - March 17, 2018
 

Russian defense minister Sergei Shoigu made a significant announcement in mid-March 2018 at a domestic technology forum. "The serial production of combat robots for the Russian armed forces may start already this year," he stated.

Shoigu also implied, in response a question about whether remote-controlled unmanned systems would be utilized in the future, that the concept of a combat unmanned system remotely operated by a human has already been implemented in the Russian armed forces.

 
The Limits Of Saudi Reform
Articles - March 14, 2018
 

Just how far-reaching are Saudi Arabia's reforms? These days, there is unbridled optimism in official Washington over what are widely seen as sweeping social and economic changes taking place in the historically-stagnant Kingdom.

At first glance, Saudi Arabia does indeed appear to be on the march. Since 2016, when he formally unveiled his
National Transformation Plan, Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salman - better known as MbS - has presided over an ambitious initiative to overhaul the national economy and Saudi society.

 
Do Merkel And Germany Have A Future?
Articles - March 6, 2018
 

Germany has a new grand-coalition government (GROKO) in sight thanks to the decision by Social Democratic Party (SPD) rank and file to agree to another link-up with Chancellor Angela Merkel's Christian Democrats (CDU/CSU). SPD dues-paying members voted by two-thirds in a postal referendum to play second fiddle once again under Merkel at the national level. Both parties are motivated by palpable fear that failure to agree would provoke new elections in which they could both lose even more votes to the right-wing Alternative for Germany (AfD) than they did in the shocking general election last September.

 
China Reform Monitor - No. 1318
Bulletins - March 1, 2018
 

China's maritime build-up;
Autonomous shipping takes shape

 
Resource Security Watch - No. 11
Bulletins - February 16, 2018
 

The hidden cost of cryptocurrency;
Tehran's toxic air;
Reclassifying climate change;
China moves to manage carbon emissions;
Indonesia's sinking city

 
Germany's Social Democrats Meet Their Day of Reckoning
Articles - February 10, 2018
 

Government formation in Germany is approaching a crunch point. The main center-right (CDU/CSU) and center-left (SPD) parties have reached an agreement on a new grand-coalition government, similar to that which preceded inconclusive national elections last September. The crunch point will be a referendum on that agreement by the dues-paying, card-carrying membership of the Social Democratic Party.

 
Trump Believes In U.S. Power
Articles - January 31, 2018
 

In the national security section of Tuesday's State of the Union speech, President Donald Trump had a single, unifying message: The administration will confront America's international challenges with a realistic appreciation for the importance of U.S. power and leadership.

 
Russia Reform Monitor - No. 2185
Bulletins - January 26, 2018
 

Whitewashing Stalin's purges;
Soviet nostalgia rears its head anew

 
Freedom On The Wane
Articles - January 23, 2018
 

When Great Britain told the United States in February of 1947 that it could no longer protect Greece and Turkey, President Harry Truman and his top aides realized that America would have to step up to protect freedom or cede the Mediterranean and maybe Europe and other regions to the Soviets.

 
A New Approach To Iran
Articles - January 17, 2018
 

The recent protests in Iran may be petering out, but the White House is ramping up its response to them. Last week, in tandem with his most recent decision to prolong the controversial 2015 Iran nuclear deal for another three months, President Trump opened a new front against the Islamic Republic by levying fresh human rights sanctions on a number of key regime figures and institutions.

 
What Trump Needs To Know To Reform US Broadcasting
Articles - January 16, 2018
 

The announcement last week by Rep. Ed Royce (R-Calif.), the powerful chairman of the House Foreign Affairs Committee, that he plans to resign at the end of his current term in office will unquestionably have enormous ramifications for the shape of U.S. foreign policy toward Syria, Ukraine, North Korea and Iran, as well as a host of other topics on which the congressman has distinguished himself during his eleven terms in office. But Royce's impending retirement will be felt in another area as well: that of U.S. public diplomacy.

 
Unconventional Wisdom in the Middle East
Articles - January 9, 2018
 

Recent events across the Middle East put the lie to one of the foreign policy establishment's most enduring tenets of conventional nonsense: that Israeli-Palestinian peace is key to greater regional peace and stability.

 
What To Watch For In Iran's Turmoil
Articles - January 8, 2018
 

Will Iran's pro-democracy protests last? As the uprisings that have unexpectedly swept across the Islamic Republic approach their second full week, that's the question on the mind of policymakers in Washington.

 
Trump's foreign policy pattern is all bark and no bite
Articles - January 8, 2018
 

Recent foreign policy moves by the Trump administration disclose a pattern of thought and action that merits being seen in its totality. Towards the end of 2017 the administration released a vigorous national security strategy that not only labeled China and Russia as adversaries but also “took no prisoners” in asserting that the U.S. would act vigorously against challenges.

 
How Washington Can Influence The Outcome Of Protests In Iran
Articles - January 4, 2018
 

These are heady days in Iran. For more than a week now, thousands of Iranians have rallied publicly against their government, demanding accountability, transparency and an end to the repressive clerical status quo. In the process, they have presented Iran's radical theocratic regime with one of the most profound challenges to its authority since the 1979 Islamic Revolution.

 
China Reform Monitor - No. 1310
Bulletins - January 2, 2018
 

Chinese spies set their sights on Germany;
New modes of surveillance hit Xinjiang

 
Law Warriors Needed
Articles - December 19, 2017
 

"The first thing we do," proclaims one of the characters in "Henry VI," Shakespeare's famous play about palace intrigue, "let's kill all the lawyers."

Over the ages, the phrase has become ubiquitous - and synonymous with popular disdain for what is widely seen as an elitist, out-of-touch profession. Yet today, the expertise of legal professionals is desperately needed to help the U.S. navigate the emerging geopolitical discipline known as "lawfare."

 
Defense Technology Monitor - No. 24
Bulletins - December 18, 2017
 

Hypersonic weapons enable global strike capability;
Dreaming of invisibility;
The brewing debate over BCI;
Naval iron dome reaches IOC;
Russia's push for an independent internet directory

 
If the US does not act, the Caucasus will be under Russian control
Articles - December 11, 2017
 

Since the Black Sea and its littorals have become contested zones between Russia and the West, it behooves us to think cogently about U.S. interests in the equally important Caucasus and how to defend them. Our vital interests are the same as the 1990s, even taking into account major changes in the regional and global strategic environment. We want these states to remain independent, enjoy real sovereignty within their treaty-defined borders, remain at peace with each other and be open to international economic markets.

 
Defense Technology Monitor - No. 22
Bulletins - December 1, 2017
 

Wirelessly charging drone subs;
The Pentagon's new EW strategy;
Reconsidering "Rods from Gods";
The hazards of hacked robots;
New military applications for AI

 
Russia Reform Monitor - No. 2166
Bulletins - November 28, 2017
 

Russia's media blacklist takes shape;
Another presidential contender rises... maybe

 
Russia Reform Monitor - No. 2165
Bulletins - November 27, 2017
 

The start of a Russo-American media war?;
The Kremlin versus crypto-currencies

 
Iraqi Kurdistan: Post-Independence Referendum
Articles - November 17, 2017
 

On September 25th, against the urging of the United States and other allies, the Kurdish Regional Government (KRG) held an independence referendum within the boundaries of its autonomous region and provocatively, without, in the city of Kirkuk. While the regional response was fast and furious, the United States did nothing, leaving the Iraqi Kurds at the mercy of a revengeful Baghdad: Erbil and Sulaimaniyah airports were closed to international commercial traffic. Turkey threatened to close borders and the Iranian and Iraqi militaries conducted joint exercises on the Iraqi Kurdish border.  Baghdad sent the Iraqi army and Iranian-backed Shia Popular Mobilization Front (PMF) militias to retake the disputed territories back from the Kurdish peshmerga. Then, on October 29th, KRG president Masoud Barzani stepped down and suspended the post of presidency, distributing control of the KRG to other branches.

 
Directed Energy Weapons And Modern Warfare
Articles - November 14, 2017
 

In a 2009 article entitled "Technology and Warfare," Professor Alex Roland of Duke University wrote that "...technology, more than any other outside force, shapes warfare.”[1] In his article, Roland went on to explain how military technologies, while not being deterministic, open doors and provide opportunities - often referred to as 'opportunity space' in current military parlance - for the nations employing them.

 
A Setback For Peace Prospects
Articles - October 17, 2017
 

Perhaps United Nations Secretary General Antonio Guterres, who called Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas to congratulate him on the new unity deal between Abbas' Fatah Party and the terrorist group Hamas, simply didn't know what Hamas had said about it a day earlier.

 
Russia Reform Monitor - No. 2161
Bulletins - October 16, 2017
 

The Kremlin doubles down on the Donbas;
A looming showdown in Syria

 
Russia Reform Monitor - No. 2159
Bulletins - October 10, 2017
 

How Russia exploits the North Korean crisis;
A helping hand for Hamas

 
Prague's Eastward Turn
Articles - October 10, 2017
 

Since its emergence from the wreckage of the Soviet Union more than a quarter-century ago, the Czech Republic has consistently ranked as a success story of post-totalitarian transition. Unlike that of many of its neighbors in Central and Eastern Europe, Prague's path toward democracy has been more or less linear, cresting in the middle of the last decade when the country garnered the ranking of "full democracy" from the prestigious Economist Intelligence Unit. Today, however, Czech democracy is showing signs of erosion, while the country as a whole is in the process of making an alarming eastward turn.

 
Russia Reform Monitor - No. 2158
Bulletins - October 9, 2017
 

Russia, Europe edge closer to political divorce;
Facebook wises up to Russian propaganda... finally