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If Britain Opts For Corbyn, Then The New Prime Minister Will Clash With Trump Over Israel
By Lawrence J. Haas, The National Interest, September 13, 2018
 

The signs of breakdown in the liberal international order are mounting, and they're coming from disparate directions: Washington battles its closest allies on trade, Beijing and Moscow come together more closely militarily in an anti-U.S. alliance, and Beijing seeks to make its territorial expansion a fait accompli in the Pacific.

 
Understanding Putins Paranoid Style
By Ilan Berman, The National Interest, September 1, 2018
 

Just why is Vladimir Putin so popular? Practically since Russia’s president first ascended to power in the last days of 1999, observers have puzzled over his broad base of support and enduring appeal, which has persisted despite needless and costly foreign entanglements and notwithstanding widespread and flagrant corruption in the Kremlin.

 
Russia Is Giving the World a Preview of Some of Its Most Advanced Military Equipment
By Samuel Bendett, The National Interest, August 24, 2018
 

This week, Russia is hosting its biggest military exhibition—Army-2018. The exhibition is held at the recently established “Patriot” expo center not far from Moscow.  Dozens of nations, thousands of military technology samples and hundreds of thousands of visitors are expected to converge at the Patriot for the next several days. The event will feature actual weapon showcases, as well as numerous discussions and forums on current and future military technology innovation and fighting tactics.

 
Iran's New Revolutionary Moment
By Ilan Berman, Al-Hurra Digital, August 9, 2018
 

Thirteen years ago, as the Bush administration and its "freedom agenda" entered its second term in office, New York Times columnist Thomas Friedman took the pulse of popular sentiment in Iran, and came away with some surprising conclusions. Iran, Friedman heard from Iranian expatriates and regime insiders, was the ultimate "red state," where the population did not share the ruling regime's hatred of the West and where people craved greater freedom and democracy.

 
Can Iran Wait Out Trump's Pressure Campaign?
By Lawrence J. Haas, The National Interest, August 8, 2018
 

U.S. foreign policy toward Iran is approaching a "back to the future" moment, with the Trump White House resurrecting the strategy pursued by President George W. Bush (and, for a while, President Barack Obama) of pressuring Iran economically into abandoning its nuclear pursuits.

 
U.S.-Turkish Relations In A Tailspin
By Ilan Berman, The Washington Times, August 8, 2018
 

It's official: U.S.-Turkish relations are in a tailspin.

The once-robust ties between Washington and Ankara have frayed considerably in recent years, riven by strategic issues like Turkey's growing strategic proximity to Russia and its cozy relationship with Islamist actors, as well as its increasingly conspiratorial, anti-American political discourse. But what may end up causing a lasting rupture between the two Cold War-era allies is an altogether different — and unexpected — issue: The fate of an American pastor named Andrew Brunson.

 
Russia's Patriotic Cinema
By Alexander Rojavin, The National Interest, August 6, 2018
 

It would be "cultural masochism" to support art critical of Russia. So says none other than Vladimir Medinsky, the Russian minister of culture. A trusted Putin loyalist and the author of a book series remarkable for its revisionist take on Russian history, Medinsky has spent his six years as Minister of Culture expanding the Ministry's control over all things artistic in the country.

 
Chinese and Russian Defense Innovation, with American Characteristics? Military Innovation, Commercial Technologies, and Great Power Competition
By Samuel Bendett and Elsa B. Kania, The Strategy Bridge, August 2, 2018
 

As great power rivalries intensify, China, Russia, and the United States are redoubling their pursuit of defense innovation in emerging technologies that could change the character, perhaps even the nature, of warfare. At present, U.S. primacy in innovation remains a critical, though contested, advantage. China is emerging as a scientific and technological powerhouse, while Russia is creatively pursuing asymmetric advantages. Since advances in these dual-use technologies, including robotics and artificial intelligence (AI), are emerging increasingly from the private sector, the capacity to integrate and leverage commercial technologies will be critical in this race for advantage.

 
Fight Against Terror Entering A New Phase, Still Just As Vital
By Ilan Berman and Chloe Thompson, USA Today, July 26, 2018
 

The war on terror now ranks as America's longest-running war. Yet, increasingly, the fight against terrorism has receded from the headlines, supplanted by acrimonious domestic politics and flashpoints like North Korea's nuclear program and trade disputes with China. Yet the war on terror still rages on — and the battlefield in that fight is changing significantly.

 
Here is How the Russian Military Is Organizing to Develop AI
By Samuel Bendett, Defense One, July 20, 2018
 

The Russian Ministry of Defense is pursuing artificial intelligence with an urgency that has only grown since Vladimir Putin’s “rule the world” speech in September. But after several years of watching American and Chinese researchers accumulate breakthroughs and funding, while Russia continues to lack a relevant high-tech culture, Ministry leaders have decided that if they can’t outspend their global competitors, perhaps they can out-organize them.